Letter to 1975

To that scrawny kid in 1975 :
 
1. Cut it out. You’ll go blind.
2. Get a haircut, you look ridiculous.
3. Try not to spend so much time on your computer. You’ll find out what a computer is in a few years.
4. Just because a girl talks to you, it doesn’t mean she wants you. Learn to spot when they aren’t interested. Also, learn to spot when they are.
5. Music theory is boring. Study it anyway. Nobody ever learned anything by not practicing it.
6. There is someone for you. You’ll meet her soon.
7. Enjoy quiet outdoor places, they’ll be a lot harder to find after you’re grown up.
8. No,you’re not grown up yet.
9. Don’t waste your time in college. Less party time, more study time.
10. Liberal arts will make you miserable. Study them anyway.
11. Don’t listen to anyone that says you shouldn’t take math and science. You’re actually pretty good in these areas. Show off a little.
12. Keep track of your friends.
13. Don’t wait until you’re forty to be interested in martial arts. Some things are meant for young men.
14. Prepare to have your heart stolen by two little girls.
15. Be kind to people, so you don’t have to remember your own harsh words.
16. Being good at what you do isn’t enough, but it’s all there is. Try to make what you do a bigger category.
17. There are some things you should enjoy while you can: your hair, V-8 engines, John Lennon.
18. Choose your entertainments carefully, because you’ll be hearing them for the next forty years.
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4 Responses to Letter to 1975

  1. LG says:

    Love it. I will have to compose a letter to my eighties too.

  2. I’d have something similar to say to my 1975 self, though I’d add, “Boys are everywhere. Be patient and hold out for someone kind and considerate. If he treats you badly, he’s not worth the tears.”

    I also wish I had worked harder as an undergraduate. College was actually cheap and affordable back when I was attending. Now, just taking a night class in Spanish is $680 minus the textbooks, which are $200. If I’d known then it would be so expensive, I would have taken Spanish in my freshman year instead of saying, “Aw, I took four years of Latin in high school. I think I’ll waive the requirement.”

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